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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
, what does it mean to the economy? especially if we don't know in it will be a deal in a month or a deal to do deal in another year? >> there's absolutely no good at this point in pushing along the current system and waiting to fix it later. yeah, no one wants higher taxes, but we're not in a dp reception rightnow. we absolutely are going to die if things start to change and in fact, the underlying real problem, the growing deficit on the path to greece, the goalets worse once we kick the can away. that will be the overriding probleming not the slowing economy not people spending money, but sure, that might not happen in the first two months, but it will eventually happen if we keep kicking down the can. we want to prove to the world that we have a solution and if it takes a few months to get there and higher taxes for a while, big deal, we will get there. that's got to be the plan not just the same nonsense. >> yeah, but larry, that's part of your point, but jonas says we're not in a bad recession, we're certainly not in a good recovery. and if we just keep falling little bit by little
to hurt the economy. >> when you can't fit a driver in a smart car, that's part the of the problem. there are studies that say over million people and other deficits, close the huge deficits might not have a huge effect on the economy, however, if taxes across the board and let's not forget the spending cuts that are ought mattic in the defense industry, defense industry alone is looking at hundreds of thousands of job cuts next year with nos mandatory cuts go into effect. i'm not saying they are. so it's both cutting and taxing, we're too focused on the tax. bottom line, the government takes it out of the system cutting and raising taxes and the small or deficit. that means that people are going to be out of work, almost by definition in the short run. but in the long run it's a healthier economy that doesn't go down the path of greece. if the long run greece would have low unemployment, but they do not, but yes, we're going to go a percent, if it happens the worse case scenario, but in five years we won't be not able to borrow money. >> brenda: julian, you can go ahead and respon
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)